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31 May 2009 @ 04:53 pm
Loose Papers  
Can I have links to the best ways to bind loose papers (as in individual sheets, not signatures) into a book? Thanks. :)
 
 
( 7 comments — Leave a comment )
Grave Tidings, Candlekeeper.grave_tidings on June 1st, 2009 12:22 am (UTC)
If you want to sew it, I'd use Japanese stab binding (just search for Japanese stab binding on YouTube or Google for tutorials).

want to glue it, the easiest way is to use Gorilla glue (I'm not kidding). Tutorial here:

http://www.persistenceunlimited.com/2006/03/fun-and-easy-how-to-guide-to-binding-your-own-paperback-books-at-homefast/

Less damaging is the Japanese stab binding of course.
Stasiastasia on June 1st, 2009 12:26 am (UTC)
If you scroll down on this link to Japanese Bindings, you'll find several that will work well for binding single sheets.

Whatcha making?

Stasia
Chérielutine on June 1st, 2009 12:30 am (UTC)
journal_pages :)

Very much still in the works, but I like to be prepared.
Stasiastasia on June 1st, 2009 12:42 am (UTC)
*glee*

I've joined up! I can't wait.

Stasia
Rachelspinrabbit on June 1st, 2009 02:40 am (UTC)
Double-fan adhesive binding is good for lots of medium-weight pages (like standard computer paper): http://www.greenchairpress.com/blog/?page_id=613
The text block you get with this method is sturdy but still flexible at the spine.

Japanese stab binding is at its best with very lightweight papers, although it can work with medium-weight paper if the textblock is not too thick, or even with heavy card if you use a stubbed structure with cloth guards.

Various types of oversewing exist, but they mostly suck.

For small numbers of very heavy pages, there are also single-sheet variants on coptic sewing -- these are covered in one of Keith Smith's books, but not one that I have.

I have two concerns about the Gorilla Glue method. One is that it's an inflexible glue, meant for rigid substrates like wood and ceramics: the spine of the books pictured won't flex much, which can be inconvenient, and if an inflexible adhesive bind is forced, the glue can crack and leave breaks in the text block or even release pages. The other question I have is the glue's long-term stability -- I looked around just a little bit, and haven't found any information either way. That said, the gorilla glue method does look slightly quicker and simpler than double-fan adhesive binding (and gluing a spine with PVA without fanning risks loose pages).
waeliscwaelisc on June 2nd, 2009 01:17 am (UTC)
Hollanders, in Michigan, has a booklet on "Single Sheet Sewing" that was developed for one of their workshops. I haven't used this one myself, but I have other instructional materials from Hollanders and they always have good detail and good illustrations.

(Also, whatever this technique is, there's some difference from Japanese stab stitch; they aren't using "single sheet sewing" as another name for that.)

From the URL above go to -->How-to Books and Kits, then -->Hollanders' Workshop Kits; 4th item down.
leiahpairsofreckles on June 4th, 2009 10:17 pm (UTC)
You could do a modified concertina binding, but instead of each fold being pages, make the folds really small, then attach your single pages to each fold with glue or stitching.

Something like this:

( 7 comments — Leave a comment )